Explain the process of radioactive dating

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In a related article on geologic ages (Ages), we presented a chart with the various geologic eras and their ages.In a separate article (Radiometric dating), we sketched in some technical detail how these dates are calculated using radiometric dating techniques.There are two definitions of half-life, but they mean essentially the same thing.Half-life is the time taken for: Different radioactive isotopes have different half-lives.The impact of the radiocarbon dating technique on modern man has made it one of the most significant discoveries of the 20th century.No other scientific method has managed to revolutionize man’s understanding not only of his present but also of events that already happened thousands of years ago.For example, the half-life of carbon-14 is 5,715 years, but the half-life of francium-223 is just 20 minutes. It is possible to find out the half-life of a radioactive substance from a graph of the count rate against time.

When they die, they stop exchanging carbon with the biosphere and their carbon 14 content then starts to decrease at a rate determined by the law of radioactive decay.

But it is possible to measure how long it takes for half the nuclei of a piece of radioactive material to decay.

This is called the half-life of the radioactive isotope.

In this case, however, it would be possible to find out how fast the water moves into any one part of the plant.

One would simply pass a Geiger counter over the plant at regular intervals and see where the water has gone. Radioactive tracers have applications in medicine, industry, agriculture, research, and many other fields of science and technology.

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